Human milk fatty acid composition and its association with maternal blood and adipose tissue fatty acid content in a cohort of women from Europe - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles European Journal of Nutrition Year : 2022

Human milk fatty acid composition and its association with maternal blood and adipose tissue fatty acid content in a cohort of women from Europe

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M. Domellöf
  • Function : Author
C. Billeaud
  • Function : Author

Abstract

PURPOSE: Human milk (HM) composition is influenced by factors, like maternal diet and body stores, among other factors. For evaluating the influence of maternal fatty acid (FA) status on milk FA composition, the correlation between FA content in HM and in maternal plasma, erythrocytes, and adipose tissue was investigated. METHODS: 223 European women who delivered at term, provided HM samples over first four months of lactation. Venous blood and adipose tissue (only from mothers who consented and underwent a C-section delivery) were sampled at delivery. FAs were assessed in plasma, erythrocytes, adipose tissue, and HM. Evolution of HM FAs over lactation and correlations between FA content in milk and tissues and between mother's blood and cord blood were established. RESULTS: During lactation, arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) significantly decreased, while linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) remained stable. Positive correlations were observed between HM and adipose tissue for palmitic, stearic, oleic, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Correlations were found between milk and plasma for oleic, LA, ARA, ALA, DHA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and PUFAs. No correlation was observed between erythrocytes and HM FAs. LA and ALA were more concentrated in maternal blood than in infant blood, contrary to ARA and DHA, supporting that biomagnification of LCPUFAs may have occurred during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that maternal adipose tissue rather than erythrocytes may serve as reservoir of PUFAs and LCPUFAs for human milk. Plasma also supplies PUFAs and LCPUFAs to maternal milk. If both, adipose tissue and plasma PUFAs, are reflection of dietary intake, it is necessary to provide PUFAs and LCPUFAs during pregnancy or even before conception and lactation to ensure availability for mothers and enough supply for the infant via HM.
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Dates and versions

inserm-03755425 , version 1 (22-08-2022)

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F. Giuffrida, M. Fleith, A. Goyer, T. M. Samuel, I. Elmelegy-Masserey, et al.. Human milk fatty acid composition and its association with maternal blood and adipose tissue fatty acid content in a cohort of women from Europe. European Journal of Nutrition, 2022, 61 (4), pp.2167-2182. ⟨10.1007/s00394-021-02788-6⟩. ⟨inserm-03755425⟩
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