Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Natural Killer Cells and Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Polymorphisms Their role in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Abstract : Natural Killer (NK) cells are important effector cells in the early control of infected, malignant and 'non-self' cells. Various receptor families are involved in enabling NK cells to detect and efficiently eliminate these target cells. The Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) family are a set of receptors that are very polymorphic with regards to gene content, expression level and expression pattern. KIRs are responsible for the induction of a NK cell alloreactive response through their interaction with HLA class I molecules. The role of NK cells in Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) has been studied for many years and induction of antileukaemic responses by donor NK cells have been reported. Conflicting data still exist on the exact circumstances in which the KIR repertoire affects and influences clinical outcome after HSCT. More large-scale studies are needed on well-defined cohorts to unravel the mechanism of action of the NK cell-mediated alloresponse in an HSCT setting.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-03349766
Contributor : Katia Gagne Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Monday, September 20, 2021 - 5:15:38 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, September 21, 2021 - 3:44:21 PM

File

 Restricted access
To satisfy the distribution rights of the publisher, the document is embargoed until : jamais

Please log in to resquest access to the document

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Jennifer Schellekens, Katia Gagne, Steven G. E. Marsh. Natural Killer Cells and Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Polymorphisms Their role in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods in Molecular Biology, Humana Press/Springer Imprint, 2014, 1109, pp.139-58. ⟨10.1007/978-1-4614-9437-9_9⟩. ⟨inserm-03349766⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

21