Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: 5-Year Experience of a French Pediatric and Neonatal Center

Abstract : Objectives: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is an established therapy for refractory cardiac and/or pulmonary failure that is not available in all centers. When infants and children require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, they are sometimes placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in peripheral centers where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is not available and then transferred on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to specialized centers. The objective of this study is to first describe one of the largest cohorts of infants and children transported by a mobile unit while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Design: We undertook a single-center retrospective study that included patients transported while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation between November 1, 2014, and May 31, 2019. Patients: All patients transported by our mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation unit during the study period were included. Computerized data collection was approved by the French Data Protection Authority (Commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés n° 2121127V0). Main results: Over the study period, our extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mobile team transported 80 patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation among which 20 were newborns (25%) and 60 were children of 1 month to 17 years old (75%); 57 patients were on venoarterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (71%) and 23 on venovenous-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (29%). The average duration of transport was 8.4 hours with a median of 8 hours; the average distance travelled was 189 ± 140 km. Transport was by air and then ground for 50% of the patients and by ground for 42%. We observed a significant decrease in the Vasoactive-Inotropic Score (125 vs 99; p = 0.005) and PaCO2 levels (67 vs 49 mm Hg; p = 0.0005) after arrival in our unit. Survival rate 6 months after PICU discharge was 46% (37). There was a statistically significant relationship between initial lactate level and mortality (p = 0.02). We observed minor adverse events in 39% of the transports and had no mortality during transport. Conclusions: We describe one of the largest cohorts of infants and children transported by a mobile unit while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Our findings confirm that it is safe to start extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a referring center and to transport patients using an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mobile team. The only risk factor associated with higher mortality was an initially elevated lactate level.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-03285220
Contributor : Jerome Rambaud Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Tuesday, July 13, 2021 - 11:04:23 AM
Last modification on : Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 5:13:17 PM
Long-term archiving on: : Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 6:48:51 PM

File

 Restricted access
To satisfy the distribution rights of the publisher, the document is embargoed until : jamais

Please log in to resquest access to the document

Identifiers

Citation

Yohan Soreze, Gabriel Smagghue, Erik Hervieux, Sabestien Julliand, Mathieu Genuini, et al.. Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: 5-Year Experience of a French Pediatric and Neonatal Center. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2020, 21 (9), pp.e723 - e730. ⟨10.1097/pcc.0000000000002421⟩. ⟨inserm-03285220⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

18