Exposition to glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids exacerbates adipocyte lipolysis and glycogen storage in rat adipose cells - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Peritoneal Dialysis International Year : 2021

Exposition to glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids exacerbates adipocyte lipolysis and glycogen storage in rat adipose cells

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Abstract

Glucose absorption during peritoneal dialysis (PD) is suspected to promote visceral fat accretion and weight gain in PD patients. The current study was designed to test the impact of glucose-based PD fluids on adipose cell lipolysis and glycogen content. Rat adipose cells, isolated from epididymal fat pad, were exposed to a 30 vol./70 vol. mixture of glucose-based dialysis solutions (containing 1.36% and 3.86% glucose, Physioneal 35®; Baxter) or Krebs-Henseleit buffer for 4 h. Adipose cells were further incubated with laboratory-made solutions containing 1.36% and 3.86% glucose or mannitol as an osmotic control. Baseline and noradrenaline-stimulated lipolysis was measured, and glycogen content assayed. The glucose-based commercial PD fluids as well as the laboratory-manufactured high glucose solutions exacerbated lipolysis in baseline and noradrenaline conditions and increased glycogen stores in adipose cells. Mannitol solutions (1.36% and 3.86%) used as an osmotic control did not produce such effects. This study provides the first evidence that glucose-based dialysis solutions increase basal as well as stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes, an effect that is directly attributable to high concentrations of glucose per se.
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Dates and versions

inserm-03246101 , version 1 (02-06-2021)

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C. O. Soulage, F. G. Egziabher. Exposition to glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids exacerbates adipocyte lipolysis and glycogen storage in rat adipose cells. Peritoneal Dialysis International, 2021, 41 (4), pp.423-426. ⟨10.1177/0896860820953060⟩. ⟨inserm-03246101⟩
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