Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

The reversed passive Arthus reaction as a model for investigating the mechanisms of inflammation-associated hemostasis

Abstract : In recent years, accumulating evidence has indicated that platelets continuously repair vascular damage at sites of inflammation and/or infection. Studies in mouse models of inflammation have highlighted the fact that the mechanisms underlying bleeding prevention by platelets in inflamed organs can substantially differ from those supporting primary hemostasis following tail tip transection or thrombus formation in models of thrombosis. As a consequence, exploration of the hemostatic function of platelets in inflammation, as well as assessment of the risk of inflammation-induced bleeding associated with a platelet deficit and/or the use of anti-thrombotic drugs, require the use of dedicated experimental models. In the present review, we present the pros and cons of the cutaneous reversed passive Arthus reaction, a model of inflammation which has been instrumental in studying how inflammation causes vascular injury and how platelets continuously intervene to repair it. The limitations and common issues encountered when working with mouse models of inflammation for investigating platelet functions in inflammation are also discussed.
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [70 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-02480075
Contributor : Benoit Ho Tin Noé <>
Submitted on : Saturday, February 15, 2020 - 2:06:44 AM
Last modification on : Thursday, April 9, 2020 - 11:53:18 AM
Document(s) archivé(s) le : Saturday, May 16, 2020 - 12:42:34 PM

File

 Restricted access
To satisfy the distribution rights of the publisher, the document is embargoed until : jamais

Please log in to resquest access to the document

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : inserm-02480075, version 1

Collections

Citation

Ophélie Le Chapelain, Soumaya Jadoui, Yacine Boulaftali, Benoît Ho-Tin-Noe. The reversed passive Arthus reaction as a model for investigating the mechanisms of inflammation-associated hemostasis. Platelets, Taylor & Francis, In press. ⟨inserm-02480075⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

79