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Role of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in short-term synaptic plasticity.

Abstract : GABAergic (GABA = gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons from different brain regions contain high levels of parvalbumin, both in their soma and in their neurites. Parvalbumin is a slow Ca(2+) buffer that may affect the amplitude and time course of intracellular Ca(2+) transients in terminals after an action potential, and hence may regulate short-term synaptic plasticity. To test this possibility, we have applied paired-pulse stimulations (with 30- to 300-ms intervals) at GABAergic synapses between interneurons and Purkinje cells, both in wild-type (PV+/+) mice and in parvalbumin knockout (PV-/-) mice. We observed paired-pulse depression in PV+/+ mice, but paired-pulse facilitation in PV-/- mice. In paired recordings of connected interneuron-Purkinje cells, dialysis of the presynaptic interneuron with the slow Ca(2+) buffer EGTA (1 mM) rescues paired-pulse depression in PV-/- mice. These data show that parvalbumin potently modulates short-term synaptic plasticity.
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https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00919583
Contributor : Olivier Caillard <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, December 17, 2013 - 1:25:52 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 10:46:03 AM
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Olivier Caillard, Herman Moreno, Beat Schwaller, Isabel Llano, Marco Celio, et al.. Role of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in short-term synaptic plasticity.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , National Academy of Sciences, 2000, 97 (24), pp.13372-7. ⟨10.1073/pnas.230362997⟩. ⟨inserm-00919583⟩

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