Phosphatidylserine-expressing cell by-products in transfusion: A pro-inflammatory or an anti-inflammatory effect? - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Transfusion Clinique et Biologique Year : 2012

Phosphatidylserine-expressing cell by-products in transfusion: A pro-inflammatory or an anti-inflammatory effect?

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Abstract

Labile blood products contain phosphatidylserine-expressing cell dusts, including apoptotic cells and microparticles. These cell by-products are produced during blood product process or storage and derived from the cells of interest that exert a therapeutic effect (red blood cells or platelets). Alternatively, phosphatidylserine-expressing cell dusts may also derived from contaminating cells, such as leukocytes, or may be already present in plasma, such as platelet-derived microparticles. These cell by-products present in labile blood products can be responsible for transfusion-induced immunomodulation leading to either transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or increased occurrence of post-transfusion infections or cancer relapse. In this review, we report data from the literature and our laboratory dealing with interactions between antigen-presenting cells and phosphatidylserine-expressing cell dusts, including apoptotic leukocytes and blood cell-derived microparticles. Then, we discuss how these phosphatidylserine-expressing cell by-products may influence transfusion.
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Dates and versions

inserm-00799527 , version 1 (07-05-2013)

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Philipppe Saas, Fanny Angelot, Laurent Bardiaux, Estelle Seilles, Francine Garnache-Ottou, et al.. Phosphatidylserine-expressing cell by-products in transfusion: A pro-inflammatory or an anti-inflammatory effect?. Transfusion Clinique et Biologique, 2012, 19 (3), pp.90-7. ⟨10.1016/j.tracli.2012.02.002⟩. ⟨inserm-00799527⟩

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