Fall prevention and vitamin D in the elderly: an overview of the key role of the non-bone effects. - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation Year : 2010

Fall prevention and vitamin D in the elderly: an overview of the key role of the non-bone effects.

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Abstract

Preventing falls and fall-related fractures in the elderly is an objective yet to be reached. There is increasing evidence that a supplementation of vitamin D and/or of calcium may reduce the fall and fracture rates. A vitamin D-calcium supplement appears to have a high potential due to its simple application and its low cost. However, published studies have shown conflicting results as some studies failed to show any effect, while others reported a significant decrease of falls and fractures. Through a 15-year literature overview, and after a brief reminder on mechanism of falls in older adults, we reported evidences for a vitamin D action on postural adaptations - i.e., muscles and central nervous system - which may explain the decreased fall and bone fracture rates and we underlined the reasons for differences and controversies between published data. Vitamin D supplementation should thus be integrated into primary and secondary fall prevention strategies in older adults.
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inserm-00663718 , version 1 (27-01-2012)

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Cédric Annweiler, Manuel Montero-Odasso, Anne Schott, Gilles Berrut, Bruno Fantino, et al.. Fall prevention and vitamin D in the elderly: an overview of the key role of the non-bone effects.. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 2010, 7 (1), pp.50. ⟨10.1186/1743-0003-7-50⟩. ⟨inserm-00663718⟩
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