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Journal Articles Cerebral Cortex Year : 2010

Retinotopic Coding of Extraretinal Pursuit Signals in Early Visual Cortex.

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Abstract

During smooth pursuit, the image of the target is stabilized on the fovea, implying that speed judgments made during pursuit must rely on an extraretinal signal providing precise eye speed information. To characterize the introduction of such extraretinal signal into the human visual system, we performed a factorial, functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, in which we manipulated the factor eye movement, with "fixation" and "pursuit" as levels, and the factor task, with "speed" and "form" judgments as levels. We hypothesized that the extraretinal speed signal is reflected as an interaction between speed judgments and pursuit. Random effects analysis yielded an interaction only in dorsal early visual cortex. Retinotopic mapping localized this interaction on the horizontal meridian (HM) between dorsal areas visual 2 and 3 (V2/V3) at 1-2 degrees azimuth. This corresponded to the position the pursuit target would have reached, if moving retinotopically, at the time of the subject's speed judgment. Because the 2 V2/V3 HMs are redundant, both may be involved in speed judgments, the ventral one involving judgments based on retinal motion and the dorsal one judgments requiring an internal signal. These results indicate that an extraretinal speed signal is injected into early visual cortex during pursuit.
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Dates and versions

inserm-00444994 , version 1 (11-01-2010)

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Pierre Lebranchu, Julien Bastin, Mélanie Pélégrini-Issac, Stéphane Lehericy, Alain Berthoz, et al.. Retinotopic Coding of Extraretinal Pursuit Signals in Early Visual Cortex.. Cerebral Cortex, 2010, 20 (9), pp.2172-2187. ⟨10.1093/cercor/bhp286⟩. ⟨inserm-00444994⟩
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