Proteomics unveil corticoid-induced S100A11 shuttling in keratinocyte differentiation. - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Year : 2007

Proteomics unveil corticoid-induced S100A11 shuttling in keratinocyte differentiation.

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Abstract

Unlike classical protein extraction techniques, proteomic mapping using a selective subcellular extraction kit revealed S100A11 as a new member of the S100 protein family modulated by glucocorticoids in keratinocytes. Glucocorticoids (GC)-induced S100A11 redistribution in the "organelles and membranes" compartment. Microscopic examination indicated that glucocorticoids specifically routed cytoplasmic S100A11 toward perinuclear compartment. Calcium, a key component of skin terminal differentiation, directed S100A11 to the plasma membrane as previously reported. When calcium was added to glucocorticoids, minor change was observed at the proteomic level while confocal microscopy revealed a rapid and dramatic translocation of S100A11 toward plasma membrane. This effect was accompanied by strong nuclear condensation, loss of mitochondrial potential and DNA content, and increased high molecular weight S100A11 immunoreactivity, suggesting corticoids accelerate calcium-induced terminal differentiation. Finally, our results suggest GC-induced S100A11 relocalization could be a key step in both keratinocyte homeostasis and glucocorticoids side effects in human epidermis.
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Dates and versions

inserm-00380030 , version 1 (16-07-2009)

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Xavier Dezitter, Fatma Hammoudi, Nicolas Belverge, Jean-Christophe Deloulme, Hervé Drobecq, et al.. Proteomics unveil corticoid-induced S100A11 shuttling in keratinocyte differentiation.. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2007, 360 (3), pp.627-32. ⟨10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.113⟩. ⟨inserm-00380030⟩
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