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Transient ciliogenesis involving Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins is a fundamental characteristic of adipogenic differentiation.

Abstract : Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an inherited ciliopathy generally associated with severe obesity, but the underlying mechanism remains hypothetical and is generally proposed to be of neuroendocrine origin. In this study, we show that while the proliferating preadipocytes or mature adipocytes are nonciliated in culture, a typical primary cilium is present in differentiating preadipocytes. This transient cilium carries receptors for Wnt and Hedgehog pathways, linking this organelle to previously described regulatory pathways of adipogenesis. We also show that the BBS10 and BBS12 proteins are located within the basal body of this primary cilium and inhibition of their expression impairs ciliogenesis, activates the glycogen synthase kinase 3 pathway, and induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor nuclear accumulation, hence favoring adipogenesis. Moreover, adipocytes derived from BBS-patients' dermal fibroblasts in culture exhibit higher propensity for fat accumulation when compared to controls. This strongly suggests that a peripheral primary dysfunction of adipogenesis participates to the pathogenesis of obesity in BBS.
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https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00370150
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Submitted on : Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 10:51:28 AM
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Vincent Marion, Corinne Stoetzel, Dominique Schlicht, Nadia Messaddeq, Michael Koch, et al.. Transient ciliogenesis involving Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins is a fundamental characteristic of adipogenic differentiation.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , National Academy of Sciences, 2009, 106 (6), pp.1820-5. ⟨10.1073/pnas.0812518106⟩. ⟨inserm-00370150⟩

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