Sexually dimorphic distribution of sst2A receptors on growth hormone-releasing hormone neurones in mice: modulation by gonadal steroids. - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Journal of Neuroendocrinology Year : 2008

Sexually dimorphic distribution of sst2A receptors on growth hormone-releasing hormone neurones in mice: modulation by gonadal steroids.

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Abstract

The ultradian pulsatile pattern of growth hormone (GH) secretion is markedly sexually dimorphic in rodents as in primates, but the neuroanatomical mechanisms of this phenomenon are not clear. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurones receive somatostatinergic inputs through the sst2A receptor (sst2A-R) and the percentage of GHRH neurones bearing sst2A-R is higher in female than in male GHRH-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mice. In the present study, we hypothesised that sst2A-R expression on GHRH neurones is modulated by gonadal steroids and constitutes a mechanism for sexually differentiated GH secretion. The distribution of sst2A-R on GHRH neurones was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in adult GHRH-eGFP mice gonadectomised and treated for 3 weeks with oestradiol or testosterone implants. In gonadectomised females supplemented with testosterone, sst2A-R distribution on GHRH neurones was reduced to the level seen in intact males, whereas oestradiol implants were ineffective. Conversely, orchidectomy induced a female 'sst2A phenotype', which was reversed by testosterone supplementation. Changes in the hepatic expression of GH-dependent genes for major urinary protein-3 and the prolactin receptor reflected the altered steroid influence on GH pulsatile secretion. In the ventromedial-arcuate region, GHRH and sst2-R, as well as GHRH and somatostatin expression as measured by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, were positively correlated in both sexes. By contrast, the positive correlation between ventromedial-arcuate GHRH and periventricular somatostatin expression in males was reversed to a negative one in females. Moreover, the positive correlation between periventricular somatostatin and ventromedial-arcuate sst2-R expressions in males was lost in females. These results suggest that, in the adult mouse, testosterone is a major modulator of sst2A distribution on GHRH neurones. This marked sex difference in sst2A-R distribution may constitute a key element in the genesis of the sexually differentiated pattern of GH secretion, possibly through testosterone-modulated changes in somatostatin inputs from hypophysiotrophic periventricular neurones.
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Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

inserm-00313755 , version 1 (23-06-2014)

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Karine Bouyer, Annie Faivre-Bauman, Iain Caf Robinson, Jacques Epelbaum, Catherine Loudes. Sexually dimorphic distribution of sst2A receptors on growth hormone-releasing hormone neurones in mice: modulation by gonadal steroids.: steroids and sst2A receptors on GHRH neurones. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 2008, 20 (11), pp.1278-87. ⟨10.1111/j.1365-2826.2008.01780.x⟩. ⟨inserm-00313755⟩
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