Traffic-related atmospheric pollutants levels during pregnancy and offspring's term birth weight: a study relying on a land-use regression exposure model. - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Environmental Health Perspectives Year : 2007

Traffic-related atmospheric pollutants levels during pregnancy and offspring's term birth weight: a study relying on a land-use regression exposure model.

(1, 2) , (1) , (1, 3) , (1, 4) , (5, 6) , (1) , (1, 7) ,
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Some studies have suggested that particulate matter (PM) levels during pregnancy may be associated with birth weight. Road traffic is a major source of fine PM (PM with aero-dynamic diameter < 2.5 microm; PM(2.5)). OBJECTIVE: We determined to characterize the influence of maternal exposure to atmospheric pollutants due to road traffic and urban activities on offspring term birth weight. METHODS: Women from a birth cohort [the LISA (Influences of Lifestyle Related Factors on the Human Immune System and Development of Allergies in Children) cohort] who delivered a non-premature baby with a birth weight > 2,500 g in Munich metropolitan area were included. We assessed PM(2.5), PM(2.5) absorbance (which depends on the blackness of PM(2.5), a marker of traffic-related air pollution), and nitrogen dioxide levels using a land-use regression model, taking into account the type and length of roads, population density, land coverage around the home address, and temporal variations in pollution during pregnancy. Using Poisson regression, we estimated prevalence ratios (PR) of birth weight < 3,000 g, adjusted for gestational duration, sex, maternal smoking, height, weight, and education. RESULTS: Exposure was defined for 1,016 births. Taking the lowest quartile of exposure during pregnancy as a reference, the PR of birth weight < 3,000 g associated with the highest quartile was 1.7 for PM(2.5) [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-2.7], 1.8 for PM(2.5) absorbance (95% CI, 1.1-2.7), and 1.2 for NO(2) (95% CI, 0.7-1.7). The PR associated with an increase of 1 microg/m(3) in PM(2.5) levels was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.00-1.29). CONCLUSION: Increases in PM(2.5) levels and PM(2.5) absorbance were associated with decreases in term birth weight. Traffic-related air pollutants may have adverse effects on birth weight.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Slama-2007-EHP-Traffic_pollutants_and_birth_weight.pdf (388.25 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Loading...

Dates and versions

inserm-00267772 , version 1 (28-03-2008)

Identifiers

Cite

Rémy Slama, Verena Morgenstern, Josef Cyrys, Anne Zutavern, Olf Herbarth, et al.. Traffic-related atmospheric pollutants levels during pregnancy and offspring's term birth weight: a study relying on a land-use regression exposure model.. Environmental Health Perspectives, 2007, 115 (9), pp.1283-92. ⟨10.1289/ehp.10047⟩. ⟨inserm-00267772⟩
236 View
430 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More