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Driving cessation and self-reported car crashes in older drivers: the impact of cognitive impairment and dementia in a population-based study.

Abstract : The complexity of driving activity has incited numerous developed countries to initiate evaluative procedures in elderly people, varying according to first evaluation age, frequency, and screening tools. The objective of this paper is to improve the knowledge of the driving cessation process regarding factors associated with crash involvement. Driving cessation and self-reported crashes during the past 5 years were analyzed with multivariate models, in a cross-sectional study including a population-based sample of 1051 drivers aged 65 years and more. Visual trouble, Parkinson disease, dementia, and stroke history were associated with driving cessation. Future dementia was associated with self-reported crashes only. Attentional and executive deficits were associated with both outcomes. The detection of attentional and executive deficits should be included in driving evaluation procedures to improve awareness of these deficits by older drivers.
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https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00173083
Contributor : Evelyne Mouillet <>
Submitted on : Friday, November 13, 2009 - 11:34:38 AM
Last modification on : Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 2:39:23 AM
Long-term archiving on: : Friday, April 9, 2010 - 2:26:46 AM

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Sylviane Lafont, Bernard Laumon, Catherine Helmer, Jean-François Dartigues, Colette Fabrigoule. Driving cessation and self-reported car crashes in older drivers: the impact of cognitive impairment and dementia in a population-based study.. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, SAGE Publications, 2008, 21 (3), pp.171-82. ⟨10.1177/0891988708316861⟩. ⟨inserm-00173083⟩

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