Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Psychosocial and other working conditions in relation to body mass index in a representative sample of Australian workers.

Abstract : BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between psychosocial and other working conditions and body-mass index (BMI) in a working population. This study contributes to the approximately dozen investigations of job stress, which have demonstrated mixed positive and negative results in relation to obesity, overweight and BMI. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted among working Australians in the state of Victoria. Participants were contacted by telephone from a random sample of phone book listings. Information on body mass index was self-reported as were psychosocial work conditions assessed using the demand/control and effort/reward imbalance models. Other working conditions measured included working hours, shift work, and physical demand. Separate linear regression analyses were undertaken for males and females, with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 1101 interviews (526 men and 575 women) were completed. Multivariate models (adjusted for socio-demographics) demonstrated no associations between job strain, as measured using the demand/control model, or ERI using the effort/reward imbalance model (after further adjustment for over commitment) and BMI among men and women. Multivariate models demonstrated a negative association between low reward and BMI among women. Among men, multivariate models demonstrated positive associations between high effort, high psychological demand, long working hours and BMI and a negative association between high physical demand and BMI. After controlling for the effort/reward imbalance or the demand/control model, the association between physical demand and working longer hours and BMI remained. CONCLUSION: Among men and women the were differing patterns of both exposures to psychosocial working conditions and associations with BMI. Among men, working long hours was positively associated with higher BMI and this association was partly independent of job stress. Among men physical demand was negatively associated with BMI and this association was independent of job stress.
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [15 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-00081443
Contributor : Delphine Autard <>
Submitted on : Friday, June 23, 2006 - 11:26:46 AM
Last modification on : Friday, October 23, 2020 - 4:44:37 PM
Long-term archiving on: : Tuesday, September 18, 2012 - 3:01:28 PM

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Aleck Ostry, Samia Radi, Amber Louie, Anthony Lamontagne. Psychosocial and other working conditions in relation to body mass index in a representative sample of Australian workers.. BMC Public Health, BioMed Central, 2006, 6, pp.53. ⟨10.1186/1471-2458-6-53⟩. ⟨inserm-00081443⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

496

Files downloads

552