The impact of increasing income inequalities on educational inequalities in mortality - An analysis of six European countries

Abstract : AbstractBackgroundOver the past decades, both health inequalities and income inequalities have been increasing in many European countries, but it is unknown whether and how these trends are related. We test the hypothesis that trends in health inequalities and trends in income inequalities are related, i.e. that countries with a stronger increase in income inequalities have also experienced a stronger increase in health inequalities.MethodsWe collected trend data on all-cause and cause-specific mortality, as well as on the household income of people aged 35–79, for Belgium, Denmark, England & Wales, France, Slovenia, and Switzerland. We calculated absolute and relative differences in mortality and income between low- and high-educated people for several time points in the 1990s and 2000s. We used fixed-effects panel regression models to see if changes in income inequality predicted changes in mortality inequality.ResultsThe general trend in income inequality between high- and low-educated people in the six countries is increasing, while the mortality differences between educational groups show diverse trends, with absolute differences mostly decreasing and relative differences increasing in some countries but not in others. We found no association between trends in income inequalities and trends in inequalities in all-cause mortality, and trends in mortality inequalities did not improve when adjusted for rising income inequalities. This result held for absolute as well as for relative inequalities. A cause-specific analysis revealed some association between income inequality and mortality inequality for deaths from external causes, and to some extent also from cardiovascular diseases, but without statistical significance.ConclusionsWe find no support for the hypothesis that increasing income inequality explains increasing health inequalities. Possible explanations are that other factors are more important mediators of the effect of education on health, or more simply that income is not an important determinant of mortality in this European context of high-income countries. This study contributes to the discussion on income inequality as entry point to tackle health inequalities. More research is needed to test the common and plausible assumption that increasing income inequality leads to more health inequality, and that one needs to act against the former to avoid the latter.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
International Journal for Equity in Health, 2016, 15 (1), pp.103. 〈10.1186/s12939-016-0390-0〉
Liste complète des métadonnées

Littérature citée [56 références]  Voir  Masquer  Télécharger

http://www.hal.inserm.fr/inserm-01343604
Contributeur : Bmc Bmc <>
Soumis le : vendredi 8 juillet 2016 - 18:03:05
Dernière modification le : lundi 29 mai 2017 - 15:34:40

Fichiers

12939_2016_Article_390.pdf
Publication financée par une institution

Identifiants

Collections

Citation

Rasmus Hoffmann, Yannan Hu, Rianne De Gelder, Gwenn Menvielle, Matthias Bopp, et al.. The impact of increasing income inequalities on educational inequalities in mortality - An analysis of six European countries. International Journal for Equity in Health, 2016, 15 (1), pp.103. 〈10.1186/s12939-016-0390-0〉. 〈inserm-01343604〉

Partager

Métriques

Consultations de la notice

141

Téléchargements de fichiers

35