Work stress and risk of cancer: meta-analysis of 5700 incident cancer events in 116,000 European men and women.

Katriina Heikkilä 1, * Solja Nyberg 1 Töres Theorell 2 Eleonor Fransson 2, 3, 4 Lars Alfredsson 4 Jakob Bjorner 5 Sébastien Bonenfant 6 Marianne Borritz 7 Kim Bouillon 8 Herman Burr 9 Nico Dragano 10 Goedele Geuskens 11 Marcel Goldberg 6 Mark Hamer 8 Wendela Hooftman 11 Irene Houtman 11 Matti Joensuu 1 Anders Knutsson 12 Markku Koskenvuo 13 Aki Koskinen 1 Anne Kouvonen 14 Ida Madsen 5 Linda Magnusson Hanson 2 Michael Marmot 8 Martin Nielsen 7 Maria Nordin 15, 16 Tuula Oksanen 16 Jaana Pentti 16, 17 Paula Salo 16, 18, 17 Reiner Rugulies 5, 19 Andrew Steptoe 8 Sakari Suominen 20, 21 Jussi Vahtera 16, 20 Marianna Virtanen 1 Ari Väänänen 1 Peter Westerholm 22 Hugo Westerlund 2 Marie Zins 6 Jane Ferrie 23, 8 Archana Singh-Manoux 8, 6 G David Batty 8, 23 Mika Kivimäki 8
Abstract : To investigate whether work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, is associated with the overall risk of cancer and the risk of colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers. Meta-analysis of pooled prospective individual participant data from 12 European cohort studies including 116,056 men and women aged 17-70 who were free from cancer at study baseline and were followed-up for a median of 12 years. Work stress was measured and defined as job strain, which was self reported at baseline. Incident cancers (all n=5765, colorectal cancer n=522, lung cancer n=374, breast cancer n=1010, prostate cancer n=865) were ascertained from cancer, hospital admission, and death registers. Data were analysed in each study with Cox regression and the study specific estimates pooled in meta-analyses. Models were adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position, body mass index (BMI), smoking, and alcohol intake A harmonised measure of work stress, high job strain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 1.04) in the multivariable adjusted analyses. Similarly, no association was observed between job strain and the risk of colorectal (1.16, 0.90 to 1.48), lung (1.17, 0.88 to 1.54), breast (0.97, 0.82 to 1.14), or prostate (0.86, 0.68 to 1.09) cancers. There was no clear evidence for an association between the categories of job strain and the risk of cancer. These findings suggest that work related stress, measured and defined as job strain, at baseline is unlikely to be an important risk factor for colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancers.
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BMJ / BMJ (CLINICAL RESEARCH ED); Br Med J; British Medical Journal; Brit Med J, 2012, 346, pp.f165. 〈10.1136/bmj.f165〉
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Katriina Heikkilä, Solja Nyberg, Töres Theorell, Eleonor Fransson, Lars Alfredsson, et al.. Work stress and risk of cancer: meta-analysis of 5700 incident cancer events in 116,000 European men and women.. BMJ / BMJ (CLINICAL RESEARCH ED); Br Med J; British Medical Journal; Brit Med J, 2012, 346, pp.f165. 〈10.1136/bmj.f165〉. 〈inserm-01153694〉

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